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Barber, Marlin – American Educational History Journal, 2018
When examining the efforts of African Americans to create and operate viable primary and secondary schools from 1865 to 1870 in Kentucky, it is difficult to not contemplate what potentially might have been had national support for the Black transition from enslavement to freedom not waned. W.E.B. Dubois and several subsequent historians concluded…
Descriptors: Slavery, African Americans, Elementary Schools, Secondary Schools
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Zervas, Theodore G. – American Educational History Journal, 2016
This paper analyzes several elementary and middle school textbooks, educational decrees, and other primary sources to help shed light on how schooling, and more generally education, during what would be known as the "Reign of the Colonels" or "Military 'Junta'" attempted to reshape a Greek national identity. This paper seeks to…
Descriptors: Textbook Content, Content Analysis, Elementary School Students, Middle School Students
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Durham, Sheliah; Spearman, Mindy – American Educational History Journal, 2015
The textile industry surged in late nineteenth-century South Carolina, quickly becoming the primary source of revenue and employment in the Northwestern, "Upstate" area of the state. The influx of industry created new job opportunities for Upstate rural farmers and sharecroppers who previously were engaged in agrarian pursuits. In order…
Descriptors: Elementary Schools, Manufacturing Industry, Semiskilled Workers, Regional Characteristics
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Field, Sherry L.; Bauml, Michelle; Bellows, M. Elizabeth – American Educational History Journal, 2014
This article is the third in a larger study of schooling during the Great Depression that seeks to elucidate specific examples of elementary social studies teaching and learning in the South during this time, particularly in Arkansas. Responding to Christine Woyshner's (2009) concern that histories of social studies should look beyond national…
Descriptors: Educational History, United States History, Economic Climate, Social Studies
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Bellows, M. Elizabeth; Baumi, Michelle; Field, Sherry L. – American Educational History Journal, 2013
Across the United States, the Great Depression was a period of tremendous upheaval. Economic, family, political, and educational institutions shook mightily as the tremors of widespread financial downturn were felt. Public schools faced increasing hardships, which included financial problems such as a weakened tax base due to the non-payment of…
Descriptors: Educational History, Financial Exigency, Educational Finance, Social Studies
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Watras, Joseph – American Educational History Journal, 2012
Writing in 1962, Phillippe Aries argued that an initial step in the movement to establish schools for children in Europe took place during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries when moralists and artists began portraying children as different from adults. According to Aries, the portrayal of childhood as a unique period enabled the family and…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Children, Role, Attitudes
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Field, Sherry L.; Bellows, Elizabeth – American Educational History Journal, 2012
This study focuses on elementary school teachers during the Great Depression and the role that they played to sustain everyday school activity. The authors draw evidence primarily from the pages of "Grade Teacher" magazine, through teachers' letters written to its editor, Florence Hale, and her responses to them. Opportunities to study…
Descriptors: United States History, Unemployment, Economic Climate, Elementary School Teachers