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Reed, Adam – Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 1977
The introduction of laboratory computers has facilitated investigation of quantitative theories in the investigation of memory. Data from a recent qualitative study was used to test two quantitative theories. The strength-resistance theory fitted the data quantitatively without significant deviations. Statistical tables and references are…
Descriptors: Language Research, Learning Processes, Learning Theories, Memorization
Johnson, Ronald E.; Scheidt, Barbara J. – Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 1977
An attempt was made to identify comparable subjective subsequences in the serial learning of a prose passage and to examine the relationship of such organizational encodings to the variable of structural importance. Results of serial learning and free recall indicated learners associatively organized individual prose subunits into subjective…
Descriptors: Cognitive Processes, Learning Processes, Learning Theories, Memorization
Colle, Herbert A.; Welsh, Alan – Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 1976
Two experiments are reported to investigate the theory that since auditory sensory memory is used to store memory information, concurrent auditory stimulation should destroy memory information and thus reduce recall performance. (Author/RM)
Descriptors: Auditory Stimuli, Cognitive Processes, Learning Processes, Learning Theories
Lesgold, Alan M.; And Others – Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 1979
Five experiments were conducted that illustrate microprocesses of discourse comprehension related to foregrounding. An intermediate case in which prior memories exist but must be reinstated to active memory was studied in detail. (SW)
Descriptors: Discourse Analysis, Language Research, Learning Processes, Learning Theories
Bower, Gordon H.; And Others – Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 1978
In experiments where hypnotized subjects learned one word list while happy or sad, retention proved to be surprisingly independent of the congruence of learning and testing moods. Learning mood provided a helpful retrieval cue and differentiating context only where subjects learned two word lists, one while happy, one while sad. (EJS)
Descriptors: Cognitive Processes, Cues, Hypnosis, Language Processing
Jacoby, Larry L.; Goolkasian, Paula – Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 1973
Paper based on experiment 1 which was presented at the Thirteenth Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society, St. Louis, Mo., 1972. (RS)
Descriptors: Acoustics, Experiments, Learning Modalities, Learning Theories
Ross, Brian H.; Landauer, Thomas K. – Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 1978
Reports on a study that sought to test theories which predict that spacing between two items to be learned improves the probability of remembering at least one of the items. (AM)
Descriptors: Cognitive Processes, Experimental Psychology, Language Processing, Language Research
Postman, Leo; And Others – Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 1978
Reviews recent experimental and theoretical analyses of the relationship between level of processing and retention, and reports on two studies which tested predictions about the effects of orienting activities on retention. (AM)
Descriptors: Cognitive Processes, Experimental Psychology, Language Processing, Language Research
Stein, Barry S.; And Others – Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 1978
Reports on two experiments which question the assumption that semantic processing is superior to nonsemantic processing, and which demonstrate that effective semantic elaboration cannot be equated with the quantity of semantically congrous information. (Author/AM)
Descriptors: Cognitive Processes, Language Processing, Language Research, Learning
Schacter, Daniel L.; And Others – Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 1978
Examines in some detail Richard Semon's analysis of human memory, places this analysis in its historical context, and discusses some reasons why this work is virtually unknown today. (Author/AM)
Descriptors: Cognitive Processes, Experimental Psychology, Learning Theories, Memory