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Varga, Nicole L.; Bauer, Patricia J. – Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 2013
The current research was an investigation of the effect of delay on self-generation and retention of knowledge derived through integration by 6-year-old children. Children were presented with novel facts from passages read aloud to them (i.e., "stem" facts) and tested for self-generation of new knowledge through integration of the facts. In…
Descriptors: Children, Retention (Psychology), Cognitive Processes, Memory
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Brito, Natalie; Barr, Rachel; McIntyre, Paula; Simcock, Gabrielle – Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 2012
Television viewing and picture book reading are prevalent activities during toddlerhood, and research has shown that toddlers can imitate from both books and videos after short delays. This is the first study to directly compare toddlers' long-term retention rates for target actions learned from a video or book. Toddlers (N = 158) at 18- and…
Descriptors: Video Technology, Television Viewing, Picture Books, Transfer of Training
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Spiegel, Chad; Halberda, Justin – Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 2011
Learning a new word consists of two primary tasks that have often been conflated into a single process: "referent selection", in which a child must determine the correct referent of a novel label, and "referent retention", which is the ability to store this newly formed label-object mapping in memory for later use. In addition, children must be…
Descriptors: Nouns, Novelty (Stimulus Dimension), Novels, Language Acquisition
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Ge, Liezhong; Anzures, Gizelle; Wang, Zhe; Kelly, David J.; Pascalis, Olivier; Quinn, Paul C.; Slater, Alan M.; Yang, Zhiliang; Lee, Kang – Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 2008
Children's recognition of familiar own-age peers was investigated. Chinese children (4-, 8-, and 14-year-olds) were asked to identify their classmates from photographs showing the entire face, the internal facial features only, the external facial features only, or the eyes, nose, or mouth only. Participants from all age groups were familiar with…
Descriptors: Children, Recognition (Psychology), Familiarity, Retention (Psychology)
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Martin-Chang, Sandra Lyn; Levy, Betty Ann; O'Neil, Sara – Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 2007
Successful reading instruction entails not only acquiring new words but also remembering them after training has finished and accessing their word-specific representations when they are encountered in new text. We report two studies demonstrating that acquisition, retention, and transfer of unfamiliar words were affected differentially by isolated…
Descriptors: Word Recognition, Retention (Psychology), Reading Instruction, Associative Learning
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Landi, Nicole; Perfetti, Charles A.; Bolger, Donald J.; Dunlap, Susan; Foorman, Barbara R. – Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 2006
To acquire representations of printed words, children must attend to the written form of a word and link this form with the word's pronunciation. When words are read in context, they may be read with less attention to these features, and this can lead to poorer word form retention. Two experiments with young children (ages 5-8 years) confirmed…
Descriptors: Young Children, Pronunciation, Retention (Psychology), Independent Study
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Hayne, Harlene; Herbert, Jane – Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 2004
In three experiments, 18-month-olds were tested in a deferred imitation paradigm. Some infants received verbal information during the demonstration and at the time of the test (full narration), and some did not (empty narration). When tested after a 4-week delay, infants given full narration exhibited superior retention relative to infants given…
Descriptors: Verbal Stimuli, Toddlers, Cues, Retention (Psychology)
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Hildreth, Karen; Sweeney, Becky; Rovee-Collier, Carolyn – Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 2003
Three experiments examined the memory-preserving effects of reactivation and reinstatement reminders following 6-month-olds' learning and forgetting of an operant task. Findings indicated that a single reactivation reminder extended infants' memory of an operant mobile task for 2 weeks, a single reinstatement extended it for 4 weeks. A single…
Descriptors: Comparative Analysis, Cues, Infant Behavior, Infants
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Messbauer, Vera C. S.; de Jong, Peter F. – Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 2003
Investigated verbal and nonverbal paired associate learning among 8- to 11-year-old Dutch dyslexic children and chronological-age and reading-age controls. Found that dyslexic children had difficulty with verbal learning of words and nonwords. Phonological and general learning errors were distributed similarly for the reading groups. Found no…
Descriptors: Children, Comparative Analysis, Dyslexia, Error Patterns
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Towse, John N.; Hitch, Graham J.; Hutton, Una – Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 2002
Three experiments investigated forgetting when a processing task is interpolated between presentation and recall of memory items with children ages 8-17 years. Findings showed consistent effects of the duration of the task, but no effects of its difficulty or similarity to memory material, and no developmental differences in task performance.…
Descriptors: Children, Cognitive Processes, Memory, Models
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Poole, Debra Ann; Lindsay, D. Stephen – Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 2002
Explored whether source-monitoring training (SMT) would help 3- to 8-year-olds report only experienced events during a target interview. Found that SMT reduced 7- and 8- year-olds' false reports in response to direct questions but had no impact on younger children's performance. Findings suggest a transition between 3 and 8 years in strategic use…
Descriptors: Age Differences, Children, Developmental Stages, Memory
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Sutherland, Rachel; Hayne, Harlene – Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 2001
Two experiments examined relation between age-related changes in retention and age-related changes in the misinformation effect. Found large age-related retention differences when participants were interviewed immediately and after 1 day, but after 6 weeks, differences were minimal. Exposure to misleading information increased commission errors.…
Descriptors: Adults, Age Differences, Children, Cognitive Development
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Davison, Laura E.; Thomas, Glyn V. – Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 2001
Investigated in four experiments claims that young children's event recall can be facilitated by drawing. Found that object recall was enhanced by replacing objects on a board as they were recalled. Recall was reduced in 5- to 6-year-olds and not enhanced in older children by drawing the board and objects concurrently with or just prior to verbal…
Descriptors: Age Differences, Cues, Freehand Drawing, Memory
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Barr, Rachel; Vieira, Aurora; Rovee-Collier, Carolyn – Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 2001
Two experiments examined whether associating an imitation task with an operant task affected 6-month-olds' memory for either task. Results indicated that infants successfully imitated a puppet's action for up to 2 weeks only if the associated operant task (pressing a lever to activate a miniature train) was retrieved first. Follow-up study…
Descriptors: Associative Learning, Cognitive Development, Imitation, Infant Behavior
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Courage, Mary L.; Howe, Mark L. – Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 2001
Examined effect of familiarization on 3.5-month-olds' retention of visual stimuli with varying delay times. Found support for retention models in which direction of attentional preferences (novel, familiar, or null) depends on memory accessibility. Short lookers showed better retention over time than long lookers, indicating that much of the…
Descriptors: Attention, Familiarity, Individual Differences, Infant Behavior
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